Why Different People Using The Same Gun Shoot Different Groups

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posted on August 25, 2019
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A reader submitted this question about why when other people shoot his sighted-in pistols, the groups would shift, and vice-versa when he would shoot theirs.

Q: I have noticed over the years that when I let someone else shoot my personally sighted-in pistols, they will group the shots considerably high and left, and conversely, if I shoot their pistol(s), my groups tend to be low and to the right. Can someone explain this phenomenon?

A: This occurrence is not at all uncommon. To explain this, one first has to understand how personal shooting is to each individual—almost like a fingerprint.

When shooting and sighting-in, many things come into play—grip, stance, position and vision—that will decipher how one needs to sight-in a gun. Any of these factors can cause different shot-groups from different people when the same gun is used, because everyone’s anatomical makeup is unique to that individual. The measurements of each person will determine how that gun will fit that individual and will determine how the gun is sighted-in.

“The Marine team members are all taught to shoot the same way—a very nonsense approach to shooting,” said 12-time NRA National Pistol Champion Brian Zins. “We experienced this same phenomenon from gun-to-gun in the hands of different shooters.”

No one individual can make another person shoot the same as they do because of their physical makeup. Therefore, when a gun is sighed in, it is sighted-in to that individual’s unique makeup.
See more: A Few Techniques About Sighting-In Your Rifle

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